Network rail archive

Railways, trams, buses, etc.
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chameleon
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Postby chameleon » Sat 03 Mar, 2012 11:00 am

liits wrote:
Brilliant. But, I hate to be one of those things that starts with a C but the red one still doesn't fit.


Nothing wrong with being Correct liitsWink

I wonder if the original was on paper or linen? The latter was used because of its longevity and resistance to the distortion and shrikage of paper.

Some small anomallies could have occured when scanned for the website, it wasn't unusual for scanners and copiers to build-in a tiny reduction factor for some reason which eludes me - but then, you'd expect any differences to be evident throughout the drawing.

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Postby cnosni » Sat 03 Mar, 2012 12:55 pm

Cardiarms wrote:
BIG N wrote:
Cardiarms wrote:
Where Bibi's restaurant and multistorey carpark are on Swinegate. In modern terms you're standing on Swinegate looking sout West-ish, with the goit flowing out of the car park in the wide arch on your right - see other threads linked to above.


Is that the large arch that is the enterance to a car par in the arches Cardi ? the one literally next door to Bibi's and if so was the tram depot / Queens hall built on part of the Kings mill site ?    

That's right    

I was walking through town in the 90's and was down here ,was lucky enough to see some digging going on,with what looked like the remnants of old stone walls.
Not being one to be shy i asked what they were excavating and they told be it was an archaelogical survey,and the building was the Kings Mill,and that when they were done it was going to be covered in concrete.

It wasnt big enough to be the whole building,just a section.

So the the bases of the wall/foundations of at least a section of the Mill are still in situe,though i wouldnt like to try and uncover them after being covered in concrete.

I would estimate that they were just under where the road is now which goes into the Criterion Place multi storey carpark,so at the side between Bibis and the arches.

I suppose i could say that i may be the only person on here to have seen the mill,or at least a couple of bits of it anyway.    
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Postby BJF » Sat 03 Mar, 2012 3:42 pm

http://www.archaeology.wyjs.org.uk/documents/archaeology/newsletters/News160312.pdf

West Yorkshire Archaelogy have published a book about Kings Mill
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Postby liits » Sat 03 Mar, 2012 3:48 pm

A cutting from the Leeds Mercury 30th December 1873 mentions the extension of the station and the alteration of surrouning streets.
[Not sure how well this will work]


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liits
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Postby liits » Sat 03 Mar, 2012 3:49 pm

Newspaper Cutting 30/12-73
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__TFMF_uqownejwvcd4q145iqzjq145_5d661831-fbcb-48b3-adfd-b0897c50eb21_0_main.jpg
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Leodian
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Postby Leodian » Sat 03 Mar, 2012 8:12 pm

BJF wrote:
http://www.archaeology.wyjs.org.uk/documents/archaeology/newsletters/News160312.pdf

West Yorkshire Archaelogy have published a book about Kings Mill


Thanks BJF for that very helpful link.

I've noticed in the publications section of the Leeds Philosophical and Literary Society website that the book is now even cheaper at £5.50 (inc post & packing). Of the book there it states:-

"The King's Mills, Leeds: the History and Archaeology of the Manorial Water-powered Corn Mills; by John Goodchild and Stuart Wrathmell (2002). 60 pp. Price (inc. post & packing): £5.50

The story of the medieval and later corn mills called the King's Mills, in Leeds. The site of the mills was redeveloped in the 1990s, but before this a major archaeological investigation took place. This revealed not only the massive foundations of the 18th and 19th century water and steam-powered mills, but also timbers associated with their medieval predecessors. These structural remains are linked to the written and cartographic evidence for the developments of the King's Mills from the 12th to the 20th centuries."
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Postby BIG N » Sat 03 Mar, 2012 10:18 pm

Interesting Newspaper cutting indeed there, who would believe in this modern day that you could travel in a straight line from Woodhouse moor to the front enterance of Leeds Station ?

Question - Schoolclose bridge ? was this swallowed up with the New Station St development and does the name infer there was a school in the area at one time ?
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Postby jim » Sat 03 Mar, 2012 11:15 pm

Hi Big N, there was a Schoolclose Mills still in existence up to the redevelopement of the area. It was between the old Co-op coal wharf and the station, and the site is now occupied by the Hilton Hotel. The site was still railway property when I started work, and one of the occupants of the mills was a firm called Simpson Solk, who were furniture wholesalers.They were railway tenants, and the lift on the property was maintained and repaired by our depot. The place was a warren, and very ramshackle. Simpson Solk are still operating from a site on the "old" Armley Road, about half way down from the Albion Pub.

Incidentally, they used to say you could always tell a railwayman, as he would inevitably give directions by pubs. Suppose it must be difficult for the present generation...........

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Postby BIG N » Sun 04 Mar, 2012 2:37 am

jim wrote:
Incidentally, they used to say you could always tell a railwayman, as he would inevitably give directions by pubs. Suppose it must be difficult for the present generation...........


Thanks Jim, yes I know of Simpson Solks of today - as for giving directions by pubs, its not only railwaymen who do this, bus drivers describe and discuss routes etc in much the same way.

In fact, and no doubt Blakey will back me up on this, I would estimate that %75 of the fare stages on running boards are either pubs or churches lol
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Postby Tasa » Sun 04 Mar, 2012 12:32 pm

Leodian wrote:
BJF wrote:
http://www.archaeology.wyjs.org.uk/documents/archaeology/newsletters/News160312.pdf

West Yorkshire Archaelogy have published a book about Kings Mill


Thanks BJF for that very helpful link.

I've noticed in the publications section of the Leeds Philosophical and Literary Society website that the book is now even cheaper at £5.50 (inc post & packing). Of the book there it states:-

"The King's Mills, Leeds: the History and Archaeology of the Manorial Water-powered Corn Mills; by John Goodchild and Stuart Wrathmell (2002). 60 pp. Price (inc. post & packing): £5.50

The story of the medieval and later corn mills called the King's Mills, in Leeds. The site of the mills was redeveloped in the 1990s, but before this a major archaeological investigation took place. This revealed not only the massive foundations of the 18th and 19th century water and steam-powered mills, but also timbers associated with their medieval predecessors. These structural remains are linked to the written and cartographic evidence for the developments of the King's Mills from the 12th to the 20th centuries."


This is the book I mentioned I had, earlier in this thread (I got it even cheaper - £1.99 in Oxfam!). It gives an excellent history of the mills and very detailed notes of the archaeological findings. There are some good photos of the dig, including the area which cnosni mentioned he saw. I'll scan a couple of the photos and post them here tomorrow (when I'll have access to a scanner). There is no mention in the book of the King's Mills stone on the riverbank.
    

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