Alwoodley Childhood.

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Derek
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Postby Derek » Mon 07 Nov, 2011 2:29 pm

I lived in King Lane ,Alwoodley Park from 1933 to 1957. Our main play areas were Adel Beck, Alwoodley Crags Plantation, Adel Crag, Nanny Beck where we caught trout by "tickling", And the large Oak trees (now gone)which used to be in "Todd's Field" opposite King Lane Parade. We used to beg lifts on Norman Todd's horse cart when he delivered creamy milk from a large metal churn, into your jug. He served huge pints! We had few "incidents " during WW2, except for the Incendiary bombs which fell on the Headingley Golf Course adjacent to King Lane Farm. We went to get the tail fins as souvenirs, but these were confiscated by the local bobby, who thanked us for collecting them on his behalf! We lost a few roof tiles when the Anti Aircraft guns on Long Causeway aimed too low at a low flying Dornier which seemed to be in trouble. I spent some school time at a temporary school on The Lane,,"A wooden Hut", and also at the Nursery Lane School before going on to Bentley Lane in Meanwood, then finally to Leeds Modern School (1939-1943) I also remember the Butcher (Jack Waterworth), Davidson's Fish shop, the Brophy brothers who had the Alwoodley Motors, Mr. Burrill the cobbler, The Misses Craighead and Suddaby (Homemade bread and Penny Buns) Our other regular entertainment was watching Alwoodley Cricket Club, in particular their Boxing Day Charity match against Yorkshire County Players. Fun Days! Derek T.
Derek T
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Leodian
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Postby Leodian » Mon 07 Nov, 2011 2:58 pm

Thanks for that Derek, which is very interesting.

Living close by I have long wondered about the small area of trees at the side of King Lane just before Nanny Beck is reached coming out from Leeds. The area of the trees seems not to be looked after other than some very occasional trimming at the pavement side. I'm just surprised that the area has not been snapped up for development, so perhaps there is some covenant that it cannot be developed. I wonder if the site is private or council owned land?

I have tried to find out but have never been successful as to how Nanny Beck and Nanny Bridge got their name. Nanny Bridge is where the beck runs under King Lane next to the now demolished Alwoodley Motors site (where a Tesco Express is currently being rapidly built).

I did not know that the field opposite the parade of shops is called 'Todd's Field'.
A rainbow is a ribbon that Nature puts on when she washes her hair.
Johnny39
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Postby Johnny39 » Mon 07 Nov, 2011 3:27 pm

Derek wrote:
I lived in King Lane ,Alwoodley Park from 1933 to 1957. Our main play areas were Adel Beck, Alwoodley Crags Plantation, Adel Crag, Nanny Beck where we caught trout by "tickling", And the large Oak trees (now gone)which used to be in "Todd's Field" opposite King Lane Parade. We used to beg lifts on Norman Todd's horse cart when he delivered creamy milk from a large metal churn, into your jug. He served huge pints! We had few "incidents " during WW2, except for the Incendiary bombs which fell on the Headingley Golf Course adjacent to King Lane Farm. We went to get the tail fins as souvenirs, but these were confiscated by the local bobby, who thanked us for collecting them on his behalf! We lost a few roof tiles when the Anti Aircraft guns on Long Causeway aimed too low at a low flying Dornier which seemed to be in trouble. I spent some school time at a temporary school on The Lane,,"A wooden Hut", and also at the Nursery Lane School before going on to Bentley Lane in Meanwood, then finally to Leeds Modern School (1939-1943) I also remember the Butcher (Jack Waterworth), Davidson's Fish shop, the Brophy brothers who had the Alwoodley Motors, Mr. Burrill the cobbler, The Misses Craighead and Suddaby (Homemade bread and Penny Buns) Our other regular entertainment was watching Alwoodley Cricket Club, in particular their Boxing Day Charity match against Yorkshire County Players. Fun Days! Derek T.


Hi Derek - Brought back a few memories there. I lived in Alwoodley Gardens, just off The Avenue from 1956 up to 1965 when I got married and moved away. It was, like you say, a great place to live and not at all the snobbish place some people liked to think it was. I played for the football team based at the Community Hall where we used the field nearest to the hall. We used to have some great dances in there. Do you remember "Fanny Gail's" on the land between King Lane and the Moor Allerton golf course? I too used to watch the Boxing Day cricket match and will always remember them playing in the snow. We used to be non-playing members of Moortown RFU Club again having many memorable nights. Mr. Todd was our milkman too, but by that time I think it would probably be his son delivering. My mother worked for many years in the P.O. on the Parade. Great days.
I would be interested in any memories you may have of Fanny Gail's.    
Daft I call it - What's for tea Ma?
Derek
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Postby Derek » Sat 12 Nov, 2011 9:30 am

Hello, Leodian. Very pleased to have any news of the Alwoodley area. I cannot identify the trees you ask about, but I left Alwoodley in 1958 for warmer climes and have only visited briefly on three occasions. As a child I knew Nanny Beck as "The Beck", and only discovered the proper name from an old map. Was the group of trees any where near the Tunnel Cottages at the top of the rise opposite Fanny Gail's "shop?" These cottages were built to house the tunnelers constructing the conduit for the Eccup reservoir to Leeds water supply. Rosie Todd, Sister to George and Norman Todd, owners of Crag Farm,lived in one of the cottages. Regards, Derek T.
Derek T

Derek
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Postby Derek » Sat 12 Nov, 2011 9:42 am

Hello Leodian. I forgot to mention that "Todd's Field' was the name given ( by we local children) to the area of tussocky grass directly opposite the Parade of shops. It is now cultivated in to a rather sterile-looking park. I don't think the name had any official status. There was a rather sparse line of trees running down the middle of the field. also a swampy patch at the lower end, near the beck, where we collected Sphagnum Moss as part of our "War Effort" in WW2.
Derek T
Derek
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Postby Derek » Sat 12 Nov, 2011 10:21 am

HI, Johnny39. What, only 39!.Yes, I remember being chased by Fanny Gail(wielding a broomstick) when she caught me collecting bilberries in her field. The field had several "shacks" which had been built before Leeds City invaded the area and tried to impose new by-laws! My Dad, Joe, Played cricket with the ACC who used to win matches in those days(ssh!) Due to war injuries received in the Battle of the Somme, he was a very, very slow bowler. At one of the Boxing day matches he bowled out one of the YCC batsmen who returned to the pavilion for duck muttering "Ah've nivver seen such a slow bowler, It shouldn't be allowed." Presumably his tongue was firmly in cheek. Do you remember the Fountain family, Mawsons, Thurgood, Jardine, Hayes, Carries' Cafe, I remember some but my memory tends to go "off-Line" nowadays. Do you remember Mrs. Verity's tea room at the "Slobbering Baby" ? Regards Derek T.
Derek T
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Leodian
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Postby Leodian » Sat 12 Nov, 2011 2:49 pm

Hi Derek. Nice to hear your recollections of the area. Regular Smiley

The small area of trees I mentioned is nearer to Nanny Beck than the site where the Tunnel Row cottages were (but on the same side of King Lane). I've been in the area since 1975 and the area of trees has always been there. It was however not that long ago when I first heard of the Tunnel Row cottages and I would never have guessed there was something once there, as there are no obvious surface signs. The swampy area on the field is still swampy, but there was some work done some years back and it is now not as bad as it was. You may be interested to know that the old Alwoodley Motors Garage closed a few years back and was derilict for some time but the site is now being developed to become a Tesco Express (a small supermarket). The very old wall at Nanny Bridge still survives, but I wonder for how long as it is showing signs of neglect. The Slobbering/Slavering/Babbling Baby spring is still there but has eroded a lot in recent years and also only occasionally has any water dripping out as water now drains out in the ground a few yards away.
A rainbow is a ribbon that Nature puts on when she washes her hair.
Derek
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JoinedCOLON Mon 07 Nov, 2011 6:45 am

Postby Derek » Mon 14 Nov, 2011 12:25 pm

Hi, Leodian, I think I have identified your patch of trees on Google Earth. It forms a roughly triangular patch between King Lane and the Buckstones with Nanny Beck at the northernmost end. When the Reddyhoff spec houses were built in the 1950s, there was just low scrub (Pussy Willow and Aspen?) so seedlings must have matured since then. I guess the area is too small, with two roads either side, for viable housing developement. Good Show, I say! In Rosie Todd's front garden, hidden amongst her roses and dahlias were some long(6ft.+ ) blocks of millstone grit hollowed out. We wondered whether they were Mediaeval coffins! More probably water troughs for livestock. Did you know the Reddyhoff houses were sold without fireplaces? There were many complaints about shoddy workmanship. "Your" trees look like Oaks but there is not enough definition in Google Earth. We used to collect conkers from a large Horse Chestnut tree on the hill opposite The Lane/ King Lane junction. It seems to have gone. Derek T.
Derek T

Derek
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JoinedCOLON Mon 07 Nov, 2011 6:45 am

Postby Derek » Mon 14 Nov, 2011 12:28 pm

Hi, Leodian, I think I have identified your patch of trees on Google Earth. It forms a roughly triangular patch between King Lane and the Buckstones with Nanny Beck at the northernmost end. When the Reddyhoff spec houses were built in the 1950s, there was just low scrub (Pussy Willow and Aspen?) so seedlings must have matured since then. I guess the area is too small, with two roads either side, for viable housing developement. Good Show, I say! In Rosie Todd's front garden, hidden amongst her roses and dahlias were some long(6ft.+ ) blocks of millstone grit hollowed out. We wondered whether they were Mediaeval coffins! More probably water troughs for livestock. Did you know the Reddyhoff houses were sold without fireplaces? There were many complaints about shoddy workmanship. "Your" trees look like Oaks but there is not enough definition in Google Earth. We used to collect conkers from a large Horse Chestnut tree on the hill opposite The Lane/ King Lane junction. It seems to have gone. Derek T.
Derek T
Derek
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JoinedCOLON Mon 07 Nov, 2011 6:45 am

Postby Derek » Mon 14 Nov, 2011 1:11 pm

Hi, Johnny 39, You seem to have made good use of the Alwoodley Community Hall. I actually laid some of the first bricks in 1948(?) when I was demobbed from the RAF. The supervising "brickie" was very kind, but when he had realigned my efforts, he decided I would be more useful pushing a wheelbarrow! When we first arrived in Alwoodley, the bus terminus was at Nursery Lane, and then "Shank's Pony" was the only transport. The terminus was extended to Alwoodley Lane end shortly afterwards. During the war, the bus service stopped at about 6,30 in the evening. Once my father and I went to see a film at the Capitol cinema in Meanwood. We had to walk home late during an Air Raid alert with search lights and ack ack shots all the time. The film was "Dangerous Moonlight!
Derek T

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